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Pakistan at the 1999 WC: the greatest ODI unit ever?

Discussion in 'Cricket Talk' started by SOPL, Oct 31, 2015.

Pakistan at the 1999 WC: the greatest ODI unit ever?

Discussion in 'Cricket Talk' started by SOPL, Oct 31, 2015.

by SOPL
Oct 31, 2015 at 4:10 PM
  1. SOPL
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    SOPL Talented

    Jun 4, 2013
    2,706
    Although the issue of the best ever complete Test team has been discussed to death on many occasions, I have rarely ever seen a comparable one for the greatest ODI unit to have graced the cricket field. So here is my choice.

    The 1999 Pakistan team: the greatest ODI team of all time?


    Amidst rising political and social disturbances in colonial India, a philosopher and Cambridge graduate named Choudhary Rahmat Ali proposed the term 'Pakstan' in his 1933 pamphlet entitled Now Or Never, now known as the Pakistan declaration. Composed of letters taken from the names of all 'homelands' - as stated by Ali - the author also attributed the meaning to be Land of the Pure from the Persian root word pāk.

    However, the history and development of Pakistan cricket can't possibly be further from the ideals strived by the Muslim League and Rahmat Ali. The Pakistan cricket team has faced many controversies over the years, from the spot-fixing trials of 2010, claims of hookers in rooms and constant allegations of match-fixing throughout the mid-to-late 90s to infighting, ball biting and ball tampering. Certainly, the global image of the team has never initiated thoughts of purity or clean cricket. The list of taints is lengthy and makes for painful reading, but ultimately it is what makes Pakistan cricket the double-headed monster that it is.

    And thus it is here where we reach the story of Pakistan cricket in the 1999 WC. Wasim Akram had been appointed as Pakistan captain for his fourth term despite the huge controversies surrounding his previous stints and Pakistan had yet again staved off accusations of match-fixing in 1998 to emerge as comfortable winners of both the Coca-Cola Cup held in Sharjah and the tri-series held in India in 1999. The Pakistan team arrived on British shores brimming with confidence and a multitude of in-form players.

    To many that experienced it, 1999 was a great year for Pakistan cricket in general. I have regularly asserted that it was the greatest World Cup of all time due to the extremely high standard of competitive cricket on offer, not least due to Pakistan's amazing team in the tournament. The fact that Pakistan's dismal collapse in the final appears to have been erased from the memories of many who recount the time attests to the overwhelming and countless joyful moments felt by those who watched the youthful side featuring in majestic lime green.

    The other less positive connotations of Pakistan cricket may appear to only serve as tarnishes on Pakistan's distinguished sporting history in the eyes of a casual fan. But, in my opinion, these have additionally strengthened the aura of unpredictability surrounding the words 'Pakistan cricket team'. The Pakistan team has long been synonymous with zeal, mercuriality and passion, so it is no surprise how they set alight the 1999 World Cup.

    However, there is something to consider about this intrinsic quality. Surely, if a team performs unpredictable acts with such ease, nobody should bat an eyelid when another occurs, considering it attains a status of being normal procedure?

    Yet this wasn't the case during the 1999 World Cup. It seemed the journey to the result in every match could be described in a few words that also emphasised the very binding fibre from which Pakistan cricket is made.

    West Indies - aggression. Scotland - crumbling top-order. Australia - passion. South Africa - unpredictability. India - disappointment. Semi-final - euphoria. Final - desolation, depression and calls of match-fixing.

    At Kolkata, Shoaib Akhtar had removed Rahul Dravid and the master batsman Sachin Tendulkar in successive balls in front of a packed Eden Gardens crowd. It followed a devastating reverse-swing spell of 5/44 at Durban the previous year.


    164705.3.jpg
    A young and rampaging Shoaib setting the Kolkata Test alight with his pace and adrenaline-fuelled belligerence.

    But Shoaib truly immersed himself into global spotlight after his fiery spells in the West Indies game - a memorable hostile bouncer for his first ball in the World Cup was hurriedly top-edged by Sherwin Campbell way over third man for six. The result was an awestruck crowd and commentator Ian Botham. The myth of Akhtar had been born, partly because of how he had replaced Waqar Younis who for so long had been a menacing tormenter of many batsman the world over.

    Wasim Akram's reigns as captain had never been calm in any sense; the one in 1999 was arguably the most relaxed of all. The now ageing magician put in a great stint to lead his roaring tigers in 1999, relying upon his guile and experience to ensnare opposition batsmen. He concluded a wonderful summer with 15 wickets at 22.80 in the WC, utilising his box of tricks even if the pace was on the decline.

    The famous quote from Allan Border goes, “If I was reborn, I’d be Wasim Akram”. And who better to be reincarnated as, if not the cricket equivalent of the commanding Carthaginian leader of antiquity, Hannibal. Hannibal revolutionised battle tactics which brought a superior and much vaunted Roman Army to its knees, whilst Akram revamped left-arm bowling and fast bowling in general into an attacking form of bowling apiece with a myriad of variation.

    Both however did not manage to fully conquer their respective enemies; the Romans and the Australians. Hannibal was shamed at the Battle of Zama after years of being back-stabbed by his political opponents in Carthage who refused to send him the resources to vanquish Rome completely - the parallel of infighting and backstabbing, along with an inability to truly subjugate those before him can be seen in Akram’s several incumbencies.

    Picture1.png
    A distraught Wasim Akram in the Hobart Test and the 1999 WC final at Lord's, respectively.

    Akram had been the one to take the decision to promote a 19 year-old Razzaq to the important #3 spot in the pivotal Australia match at Headingley - even after failing the initiation VS Scotland. He was also crucial to Saqlain Mushtaq's selection in the ODI squad in 1995, especially in his decision to opt for him in the death overs.

    The 1993 revolt occurred as a result of his dictatorial captaincy style but by 1999 Wasim Akram had managed to pacify his own temperament to an extent and led a side oriented around youth with immense authority. Considering his skill with the ball, it was no surprise at the level of progressive style of tactics employed with him at the helm. So much so that even after Justice Qayyum advised him never to be given an authoritative position in the team again, he was still arguably the real brain behind all of the tactics of the team when Moin Khan acquired the captaincy in 2000.

    After an exuberant display in the Australian game at Headingley, where Inzamam-Ul-Haq top-scored with 81 - ably supported by Razzaq's 60, Moin Khan's late-over heroics, the seamers and a healthy dose of fervent Pakistan support - Pakistan yet again threw down the gauntlet in the match against NZ after posting a hefty total of 269/8. It was to be a coast for Pakistan after the New Zealand top-order was craftfully dismantled by a dazzling Shoaib Akhtar and the in-seamers of Azhar Mahmood.


    pakistan-1999-world-cup-team-shoaib-akhtar-a.png
    Shoaib during the 1999 World Cup

    Similar performances followed in the later matches, not to mention the depressing lows. This is the tale of the 1999 World Cup, the tournament which I believe featured the greatest Pakistan ODI team of all time and undoubtedly for me the most watchable team to have graced the field. Ebullient, thrilling, hypertension-causing whilst simultaneously being huge underachievers and infuriatingly depressing: the showing at the 1999 World Cup epitomised into one what Pakistan cricket is all about.

    Therefore for me personally, the team in 1999 was the greatest ODI unit ever. It might not have been the most temperamentally stable team to have played but purely on paper it surely ranks amongst the top to have ever graced the field of play.

    The title of the greatest Test team falls to Steven Waugh's noughties team or Clive Lloyd's late 70's/early 80's side but in my eyes the '99 Pakistan team was comfortably the best ODI XI to have appeared together for the same team.

    Yousuf Youhana usually batted at 6 in the 1999 World Cup but it is blatantly obvious in the years that followed that he was totally suited to batting in the middle-order and Razzaq was principally a late-order hitter. Thus, I would swap their positions and this would be the team combination:

    Saeed Anwar
    Afridi
    Ijaz Ahmed
    Yousuf Youhana
    Inzamam-Ul-Haq
    Abdul Razzaq
    Moin Khan†
    Azhar Mahmood
    Wasim Akram*
    Saqlain Mushtaq
    Akhtar

    The batting line-up was all about attack rather than defence. The Kirsten-Gibbs and Waugh-Gilchrist were superior and significantly more stable opening duos but in terms of destructive force on their day arguably no duo could arguably eclipse the combination of Anwar-Afridi, particularly on the flat batting pitches at Sharjah/in Asia.

    Even if the destructive Afridi was to fall early in a hypothetical match, Anwar would be able to battle with the best. As Rameez Raja once commented: "Anwar used an eclectic approach to batting – classical betrothed to unorthodox, footwork against spin as quick as a hiccup supple yet powerful to brush the field like a Picasso." Shane Warne also deemed him to be the greatest all-round batsman he has ever bowled to. No compliment can ever hold as much precedence as this considering Warne's stature as at least being the greatest spin bowler to have featured internationally, and possibly the greatest of any style.

    Inzamam's proficiency as a match-winner in ODIs is renowned, and whilst Ijaz's statistics may not be evocative of a legendary batsman, they do not do him full justice. He has the second-lowest innings : Test century ratio of any Asian batsmen playing in Australia (after Gavaskar), a tremendous feat considering the overwhelming strength of the Australian sides of the 1990's. A wonderful back-foot player who scored a Test 115 on a fast WACA pitch in 1999, he also registered a blazing 139* (84) interspersed with 9 sixes chasing 216 against India in a 1997 ODI. An ungainly and awkward batting stance that looked like it would make him a suspect of being dismissed BBW (Buttock Before Wicket), he had a wide array of shots in his arsenal that allowed him to offer something different from the rest.

    There have been more formidable batting attacks in ODIs, such as the the great West Indian teams consisting of Greenidge and Haynes at the top of the order with King Viv, Kallicharan and Clive Lloyd and Kallicharan following suit springing to mind. However, nobody within the great West Indian teams of the 1980's managed to buckle down the #6 position and make it their own.

    Collis King stole the eponymous title of 'King' from the supreme Viv for his lone claim to flame in the 1979 World Cup final but he never managed to hold the position down, fading into obscurity after his decision to appear in the 1983/84 rebel tour to SA. Perhaps it was due to the fact that dominance in the position wasn't required considering the pre-eminence of the rest of the batting order but this is certainly a gaping chasm in the line-up.

    Furthermore, the West Indian batting locomotive was not the same goliath against quality spin as it was against all other forms of bowling. Abdul Qadir showed their disposition to capitulate against quality spin with his wizardry of 21 wickets in the 1986 Test series held in Pakistan - in which he attained 6/16 in the second innings of the Faisalabad Test where the mighty Windies fell for 53 chasing 240 - as well as captivating spells Down Under in the B & H Cup of 1984.

    Additionally, the distinction of causing the lowest series batting average for the West Indies during the two decades in which they established an absolute dominion over the cricket world falls to Pakistan in the 1986 Test series held in Pakistan. The combined batting average of the team for the series was a measly 19.40. Moreover, the marauding West Indies only lost two Test series after being steamrollered by the Australians in 75/76 - in India in 1978 and in NZ in 1980, the latter being mainly as a result of unbelievably biased and - although it is debatable - apparently racist umpiring. And whilst many would be fearful of claiming it, I personally believe Richards had a weakness against quality spin, particularly later on in his career.

    Besides these two points there is a more conspicuous and indisputable blemish on an otherwise brilliant side: the lack of a quality spinner. Lance Gibbs may have been a quality Test match bowler with 309 wickets at an economy of 1.98 but he never had much opportunity to play ODIs due to his age and the ascendancy of ODIs not correlating. Meanwhile, Roger Harper was undoubtedly an electric fielder but he was in no means a brilliant 'offie' like Saqi, and could not be relied upon to run through sides or perform under the cosh with such prominence as Saqlain did time and time again.

    So all in all, despite the commanding and compelling nature of the great Caribbean teams under Lloyds' and Richards' captaincy, there were still a few unfulfilled voids in their line-ups, especially in terms of spin. The frightening pace battery would most likely have struggled (relatively) to have the same potency on the modern Sharjah and sub-continent wickets where the ability to reverse swing the ball is key.

    In terms of the noughties Aussie team being the greatest, the case is much stronger. There were arguably no weak links in the numerous great teams they put forward in their WC dominance between 1999 and 2007. They had the greatest ODI finisher of all time in Bevan, a true scrapper in Steve Waugh, Ricky Ponting, an amazing opening partnership of Gilchrist-Waugh and subsequently Gilchrist-Hayden after their victory in '99 and an outstanding core of Warne, Brett Lee and Mcgrath for their bowling attack. Whenever a player was ruled out due to injury it seemed there was an infinite assembly line of sub-30 bowlers lining up to take the open spot.

    However, in terms of diversity and breadth of a bowling attack arguably nothing has matched the '99 Pakistan side. Wasim Akram played the role of the cunning genius with his complete mastery of seam and swing, and under Akram I believe the other players - especially Razzaq - could have flourished. He may not have been an Imran but by all accounts Akram was a hard taskmaster, and almost certainly would have tried to inhibit Razzaq's spiralling fitness and attitude. Mahmood could also have been prevented from fading into the wilderness had he not been a product of mismanagement by the board/team management.

    McGrath the metronome was an asset on all wickets despite what the traditional manuals would suggest about fast-medium bowling on dead and placid wickets but I think the combination of Razzaq and Mahmood would eclipse McGrath - even if by a whisker - simply by the thinking that two is better than one. That is not a smear on either Razzaq's or Mahmood's ability with the ball but rather a judgement on McGrath's profound dominance regardless of the conditions.

    However, consider the scenario of if McGrath failed. Brett Lee was certainly a real force to deal with in ODIs but he was not a fearsome or effective as Shoaib - in either pace, bowling skill or psychologically annihilating an opposition. Despite Akhtar's career being earmarked by controversy, bitterness and petty infighting, Akhtar would have made close to his full potential under Akram's wing.

    Abdul Razzaq was a genuine 87-90 MPH quickie with prodigious ability to reverse swing the ball when he first appeared on the international scene, as evidenced by his performance against Sri Lanka in an unforgettable, back-from-the-death ODI that took place in Sharjah 1999. To complete the pace bowling set Azhar Mahmood showed from his performances in the 1999 World Cup and the '99 tri-series final (5/33 against India) his subtle control of the seam. In the Pepsi Cup final of 1999 hosted in Bangalore, Geoffrey Boycott termed Azhar Mahmood's deliveries "firecrackers" given their explosive movement off even the flattest of pitches. The Indian middle-order had no protection against the TNT held in Azhar's armoury, and the Indian crowd rioted yet again at the disgust of their team's performance.

    hqdefault.jpg
    An ecstatic Azhar during the tri-series final held in India, 1999.

    To conclude, Pakistan’s bowling unit was far more varied than Australia’s. Razzaq and Mahmood offered reverse swing and seam respectively, Shoaib brutal pace and aggression and Wasim the tactical and practical nous unlike any other bowler in history. And then there is the small matter of Saqlain Mushtaq, the greatest ODI spin bowler of all time - both economical and a dynamic wicket-taker - who would pip Shane Warne to the post quite comfortably in the greatest ODI XIs of all time.

    So varied was their attack was that during the 1999 World Cup Waqar Younis and Mushtaq Ahmed had been omitted from the line-up. Waqar may have been past his prime after being plagued by back injuries, but it is a point to reflect upon that a bowler with his otherworldly reputation was not able to make his way into the line-up solely on the basis of international repute. And whilst Mushtaq may not have tasted the same international success as Waqar, his bucketload of wickets at a great average in several Somerset stints conveyed his prowess on English surfaces. The stature of Saqlain was such though that he could not be dislodged from his position in the line-up.

    Pakistan with their three all-rounders (including Afridi and Wasim) had unbelievable batting depth with a double centurion in Wasim coming in at 9, a luxury that was not afforded to the Australian teams of the noughties. If their top and middle-order was to be removed relatively early, nobody with genuine hard-hitting ability lower down the order would be able to rescue their side.

    In conclusion, the Australian team may have had more world-class and domineering players but they did not have the overall depth and diversity of the 1999 Pakistan side.

    The happiness of the summer of 1999 may have been relatively short-lived but in my opinion, the Pakistan side in the '99 World Cup was the greatest mix of players to have ever appeared on TV, if only on paper.

    Has there even been a side with as much overall strength, versatility and ultimately flair and flamboyance?
     
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Comments

Discussion in 'Cricket Talk' started by SOPL, Oct 31, 2015.

    1. Mercenary
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      Mercenary The Lone Wolf

      Dec 17, 2009
      16,711
      Fully agreed, this was one of the most complete ODI units of all time from any country.

      The pace of Wasim, Waqar and Akhtar. The medium pace of Razzaq and Azhar, the spin of Saqlain and Mushy. Batsmen the calibre of Anwar, Inzamam, Saleem and MoYo. Hard hitters like Afridi, Razzaq, Akram, Moin, Azhar, Ijaz.

      That team would reach the final or win in any World Cup you put them into.
       
    2. ASLI-PATHAN
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      ASLI-PATHAN Cricistan Khan

      Apr 26, 2011
      64,583
      They might be the greatest ODI team of all time but they were also the culprits who started a mental block against Aussies in the ODIs especially after that dismal performance in the final where they fell like a pack of cards. And secondly not playing Waqar in the majority of matches was not because Waqar had lost his abilities it was purely because of the animosity of Akram towards Waqar. Waqar was still miles better than Razzaq & Azhar as a bowler.

      And in my opinion our middle order batting was not so great. Ijaz Ahmed was never a goof batsman and Salim Malik was just finished at the fag end of his career. Bowlingwise this team was unmatchable but batting was not so great with only 2-3 good batsmen. And they showed this weakness when it mattered the most in the final against the Aussies.
       
    3. ASLI-PATHAN
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      ASLI-PATHAN Cricistan Khan

      Apr 26, 2011
      64,583
      Great article @SOPL though.
       
    4. Disco Lemonade
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      Disco Lemonade Design Artist

      Dec 17, 2009
      5,901
      great article bring back memories.

      this was the first world cup i watched with full understanding of cricket. still remember each game pakistan played and where i watched it.

      Akhtar's first ball in the series to the west indian opener, it was a bouncer which went for a top edge six behind the keeper.
      Us loosing against india in group stages, seemed so, well better not talk about it ;)
      saqlain's hattrick against zimbabwe in the super sixes
      akhtar's bowling spell against the kiwis, yorker to fleming and wicket of twose
      moin khan innings against the aussies in super sixes, his six to mcgrath
      group game against the aussies
      saeed anwars dropped catch of klusner, we lost the game to saffer which we should have won

      so many more memories, except for the final, i didnt see it after saleem malik got out. didnt see a single ball bowled by pakistan.
       
    5. Passionate Pakistani
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      Passionate Pakistani Fantasy Draft Wins: 1

      Jun 10, 2011
      68,365
      Great article @SOPL bring back some great memories of childhood man. Watched all world cup and sometimes had to stay awake till 2/3 am in morning for some matches and then school at 7 in morning lol.

      Yeah it was a great side but as mentioned by @ASLI-PATHAN our batting was still quite weak, we had several poor shows with the bat in that world cup and were mostly rescued by the lower order. Even against scotland we struggled but Muhammad Yousuf, (Known as Yousuf Yohana back then) scored big and kept us in the match. Batting flopped against Bangladesh, India, SA, Windies and Australia in Final. But our bowling was sensational, that bowling line up was good enough to defend even a score of 200.

      There are still some doubts over games against Bangladesh, India and Australia in Final and most of the people think that those games were fixed. Bangladesh one in particular.
       
    6. Mercenary
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      Mercenary The Lone Wolf

      Dec 17, 2009
      16,711
      The batting was strong on paper but weak in reality. Ijaz and Salim were nearing the end, MoYo and Wasti were green. Only Inzi and Anwar were at their peaks. A lot of the time it was Akram, Azhar and Moin who were saving our skins.

      However Ijaz averaged 35 that year and MoYo averaged 44. Only Wasti and Saleem averaged in the mid 20s. So as a team they had the batting and the bowling to make and defend the runs needed to win the majority of their games.
       
    7. Disco Lemonade
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      Disco Lemonade Design Artist

      Dec 17, 2009
      5,901
      That world cup never had big 1st innings totals. not many batsmen scored hundreds either. but after the semi final opening stand of wasti and anwar, we were favorites to win the final. i think the favorites tag got to our head as usual.
       
    8. Passionate Pakistani
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      Passionate Pakistani Fantasy Draft Wins: 1

      Jun 10, 2011
      68,365
      i dont think salim malik played many games in world cup..wasti selection was also weird since aamir sohail hadnt retired yet and Afridi was also there in squad.
       
    9. Ahson8
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      Ahson8 Fantasy Draft Wins: 1

      Jun 9, 2012
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      Top article @SOPL
      I haven't gone through the whole thing but the excerpts I went through were top class.
       
    10. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      Best Pakistan 90s post Imran odi unit:
      1. Saeed Anwar
      2. Aamir Sohail
      3. Mohd Yousuf
      4. Inzamam
      5. Younus Khan
      6. Shahid Afridi
      7. Moin Khan
      8. Wasim Akram
      9. Saqlain Mushtaq
      10. Shoaib Akhtar
      11. Waqar Younus
      99 WC lineup dint have Aamir Sohail or Ijaz Ahmed, Wajahat ullah Wasti was the opener in 99 WC whereas Aamir Sohail deserved to be selected!!
       
    11. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      99 WC lineup was this and not as mentioned by the OP. correct me if i am wrong!

      1. Saeed Anwar
      2. Wajahatullah Wasti
      3. Razzaq
      4. Inzamam
      5. Mohd Yousuf
      6. Azhar Mehmood
      7. Moin Khan
      8. Wasim Akram
      9. Shahid Afridi
      10. Saqlain Mushtaq
      11. Shoaib Akhtar
      i think Aamir Sohail deserved to play in Wasti's place and Waqar in place of Mehmood and Ijaz Ahmed in place of Razzaq. that would look a lot better!

      99 WC lineup that should have been

      1. Saeed Anwar
      2. Aamir Sohail
      3. Ijaz Ahmed
      4. Inzamam
      5. Mohd Yousuf
      6. Shahid Afridi
      7. Moin Khan
      8. Wasim Akram
      9. Saqlain Mushtaq
      10. Shoaib Akhtar
      11. Waqar Younus
      Bowling : Wasim and Shoaib open the bowling and bowl 5 each at the start. Saqlain 1st change 4 overs. Waqar 2nd change 5 overs. Afridi 7 overs in the middle overs from over 22. Wasim a 2 over comeback spell. Shoaib a 2 over comeback spell. 25 overs done. Aamir Sohail with a 5 over spell from over 27. Saqlain and Wasim in the modern powerplay overs 36-40. Waqar 4 overs at the death. Shoaib 2 overs at the death. Wasim 1 over at the death, Saqlain 3 overs at the death.
       
    12. Karachi-King
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      Karachi-King Talented

      Jun 4, 2011
      1,094
      Article is mired in delusion. Wasn't even the Greatest Pakistani ODI unit let alone the greatest ODI unit ever. The 1987 WC squad was infinitely better than this one. Australia 2003 (despite Warne injury) and West Indies 1979 are much better than either too.

      The 99 team lost 3 games in the WC if you do not remember which is too many games to lose in a given tournament and still want to be considered great. To add to that it had a fairly mediocre batting line up which laced dynamism and ability to bat the opposition out of the game. And like most Pakistani lineups, collapses were a hall mark. Great and very complete bowling attack though
       
    13. Bouncer
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      Bouncer Talented

      Jan 14, 2010
      1,016
      Really enjoyed reading it.
       
    14. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      There was a collapse in the World Cup final cus there were too many allrounders rather than the specialists. When the pressure comes, more often the bits and pieces and allrounders crumble under pressure than specialists therefore i think Waqar Younus, Aamir Sohail and Ijaz Ahmed should have been in the lineup in places of Mehmood, Razzaq and Wasti.
       
    15. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      i think salim malik dint play that final! u had Wasti opening the inns and then 4 allrounders Wasim Afridi Razzaq and Mehmood plus there was Saeed Anwar Inzamam if Salim Malik would have played he would have played in the place of Youhana i think!!
       
    16. Disco Lemonade
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      Disco Lemonade Design Artist

      Dec 17, 2009
      5,901
      yup, i meant to say ijaz?! both are related aswell as were involved in similar activities if you know what i mean
       
    17. s_h_a_f
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      s_h_a_f Moderator

      Dec 26, 2011
      8,488
      Still gutted about the manner we lost that 99 final. Shocking.
       
    18. Rhythm
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      Rhythm Cornered Tiger

      Nov 27, 2014
      10,854
      Missing a gun opener to partner Anwar and a #3.

      The bowling couldn't be stronger.
       
    19. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      Aamir Sohail and Ijaz Ahmed plus Waqar Younus in places of Razzaq, Mehmood and Wasti!!
       
    20. Rhythm
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      Rhythm Cornered Tiger

      Nov 27, 2014
      10,854
      You don't take out your best allrounder.

      Ijaz and Sohail were good players, nothing more.

      To be the greatest ODI squad, we'd need Sehwag/Jayasuriya and a Ponting at 3.

      Waqar replaces Azhar.

      Anwar
      Jayasuriya like opener
      Ponting like #3
      Yousuf
      Inzi
      Razzaq
      Moin
      Wasim
      Saqlain
      Waqar
      Shoaib
       
    21. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      u will have to settle with what u have! u cant get players from other countries and Sohail and Ijaz in 90s were very gud!! And where u need a 2nd spinner u are playing 4 pacers!! Afridi is a requirement of the team cus he is a legspinner and he is perfect for bowling overs between 21st till 35th over!!
       
    22. Rhythm
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      Rhythm Cornered Tiger

      Nov 27, 2014
      10,854
      I was replying to OP that it's not the greatest and we'd need batsmen like those two to make it so.

      Agreed with your team. Afridi replaces Yousuf in the subcontinent, sits out otherwise.
       
    23. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
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      Yousuf? u need atleast 5 batsmen! u would replace Razzaq with Afridi too!!
       
    24. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      1. Saeed Anwar
      2. Aamir Sohail
      3. Ijaz Ahmed
      4. Inzamam
      5. Mohd Yousuf
      6. Shahid Afridi
      7. Moin Khan
      8. Wasim Akram
      9. Saqlain Mushtaq
      10. Shoaib Akhtar
      11. Waqar Younus
       
    25. Rhythm
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      Rhythm Cornered Tiger

      Nov 27, 2014
      10,854
      Razzaq was a good enough batsman. We bat deep till 8. It won't matter.
       
    26. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      pls just have a look at my lineup first. u have to look at combination. why do u need 6 bowlers + sohail can also bowl. u need 5 regular plus sohail as 6th. u need 5 batsmen atleast!!
       
    27. Rhythm
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      Rhythm Cornered Tiger

      Nov 27, 2014
      10,854
      Then why would you choose Afridi over Razzaq who was twice the player.
       
    28. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      simply because i need a 2nd spinner rather than a 4th pacer. Afridi bowls in those middle overs between overs 20-35. Razzaq wont bowl at that time. Afridi is more suited to that role!! u have 3 pacers, u have 1 spinner Saqlain so u need a 2nd spinner and not to forget Afridi is a legspinner which brings variety to the attack and a legspinner is always a wkt-taking option!!
       
    29. s_h_a_f
      Online

      s_h_a_f Moderator

      Dec 26, 2011
      8,488
      Replace Razzler with Afridi? LOL
       
    30. Shahzad.Firdous
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      Shahzad.Firdous Cornered Tiger

      May 29, 2010
      12,438
      Ok Razzaq maybe a better choice than Afridi in those conditions!

      1. Saeed Anwar
      2. Aamir Sohail
      3. Ijaz Ahmed
      4. Inzamam
      5. Mohd Yousuf
      6. Razzzaq / Afridi
      7. Moin Khan
      8. Wasim Akram
      9. Saqlain Mushtaq
      10. Shoaib Akhtar
      11. Waqar Younus
      this is the final lineup that should have been at World Cup 99
       
    31. Fireworks11
      Offline

      Fireworks11 Fantasy Draft Wins: 1

      Sep 22, 2012
      31,416
      What a side man. Just wow. Legends everywhere.

      And look at odi side now lol.
       

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